#601

CHILD AND ELDER ABUSE REPORTING - LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR ATTORNEYS


--- 1.0 AZ,CA,CO,CT,FL,ID,IL,NH,NJ,NY,NV,OR,PA,WA
--- family law
--- course production date: 2/10/2018
--- presented by GEORDIE DUCKLER

GEORDIE DUCKLER
The first part of this course is a straightforward and thorough examination of the past, present, and future of child abuse reporting issues and obligations for Oregon attorneys. A comprehensive exploration of the statutory scheme is presented in the framework of some general philosophical principles regarding good conduct and some real world applications. The details and practicalities of this important social concern are presented in an entertaining and educational fashion.

The second part of the course is on elder abuse. Any attorney who works with elderly clients or works with clients who – though not themselves elderly – have legal issues directly regarding an elderly relative or family member, will eventually confront some risk of encountering a suspected or real elder abuse situation.

Among the concerns that are then raised are questions about a) what really constitutes true abuse as contrasted with benign neglect, inattention, or plain old garden variety incivility; b) if, when, and how the situation should be reported if abuse is present; c) if, when and how any confirmation is required before reporting anything to anyone; and d) if, when, and how the various obligations imposed by professional responsibility rules, ethical guidelines, and rules on client confidentiality come into play to either constrain, embolden, or obligate the reporter in their role as an attorney as opposed to simply a concerned citizen or neighbor.

State statute and published case law in this particular area is not entirely exhaustive of the answers to the myriad questions raised, and a more comprehensive analysis requires consideration of some general legal principles, some quirky philosophical issues, and some lawyer-constructed common sense and life experience. This course examines the routes to obtaining all of those answers in this fascinating area of law.

Key course points are:
• Excellent working knowledge of the state statutory scheme.
• Broad scale grasp of the real world problems inherent in reporting abuse.
• Appreciation of the tensions and conflicts attorneys have separate from others.
• Thoughts for future solutions to reporting problems.


--- presented by GEORDIE DUCKLER

Geordie Duckler, Ph.D., Esq., has been a noted trial attorney for over 29 years, actively engaged in the litigation, defense, and trial of civil and criminal cases and appeals of all types across the country, in both state and federal court.

As a popular lecturer, as well as a nationally known practitioner, Geordie has been profiled extensively in the media about his cases, including in The Oregonian, The Tribune, Willamette Week, The National Law Journal, Court TV Radio, Geraldo, Newsweek, The New Yorker, Playboy, and Bark. He has also been featured on National Public Radio, on the BBC, and in two National Geographic nature documentaries.

Education:
M.S. from University of Oregon in 1984
J.D. from Lewis & Clark Law School in 1987
Ph.D. in Biology from UCLA in 1997